Seminars

Nov
11
Fri
Hui Guan (University of Massachusetts Amherst) “Towards Accurate and Efficient Edge Computing Via Multi-Task Learning” @ Hackerman Hall B17
Nov 11 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Abstract

AI-powered applications increasingly adopt Deep Neural Networks (DNNs) for solving many prediction tasks, leading to more than one DNNs running on resource-constrained devices. Supporting many models simultaneously on a device is challenging due to the linearly increased computation, energy, and storage costs. An effective approach to address the problem is multi-task learning (MTL) where a set of tasks are learned jointly to allow some parameter sharing among tasks. MTL creates multi-task models based on common DNN architectures and has shown significantly reduced inference costs and improved generalization performance in many machine learning applications. In this talk, we will introduce our recent efforts on leveraging MTL to improve accuracy and efficiency for edge computing. The talk will introduce multi-task architecture design systems that can automatically identify resource-efficient multi-task models with low inference costs and high task accuracy.
Biography
Hui Guan is an Assistant Professor in the College of Information and Computer Sciences (CICS) at the University of Massachusetts Amherst, the flagship campus of the UMass system. She received her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from North Carolina State University in 2020. Her research lies in the intersection between machine learning and systems, with an emphasis on improving the speed, scalability, and reliability of machine learning through innovations in algorithms and programming systems. Her current research focuses on both algorithm and system optimizations of deep multi-task learning and graph machine learning.
Dec
2
Fri
Minje Kim (Indiana University) “Personalized Speech Enhancement: Data- and Resource-Efficient Machine Learning” @ Hackerman Hall B17
Dec 2 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Abstract

One of the keys to success in machine learning applications is to improve each user’s personal experience via personalized models. A personalized model can be a more resource-efficient solution than a general-purpose model, too, because it focuses on a particular sub-problem, for which a smaller model architecture can be good enough. However, training a personalized model requires data from the particular test-time user, which are not always available due to their private nature and technical challenges. Furthermore, such data tend to be unlabeled as they can be collected only during the test time, once after the system is deployed to user devices. One could rely on the generalization power of a generic model, but such a model can be too computationally/spatially complex for real-time processing in a resource-constrained device. In this talk, I will present some techniques to circumvent the lack of labeled personal data in the context of speech enhancement. Our machine learning models will require zero or few data samples from the test-time users, while they can still achieve the personalization goal. To this end, we will investigate modularized speech enhancement models as well as the potential of self-supervised learning for personalized speech enhancement. Because our research achieves the personalization goal in a data- and resource-efficient way, it is a step towards a more available and affordable AI for society.

Biography

Minje Kim is an associate professor in the Dept. of Intelligent Systems Engineering at Indiana University, where he leads his research group, Signals and AI Group in Engineering (SAIGE). He is also an Amazon Visiting Academic, consulting for Amazon Lab126. At IU, he is affiliated with various programs and labs such as Data Science, Cognitive Science, Dept. of Statistics, and Center for Machine Learning. He earned his Ph.D. in the Dept. of Computer Science at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. Before joining UIUC, He worked as a researcher at ETRI, a national lab in Korea, from 2006 to 2011. Before then, he received his Master’s and Bachelor’s degrees in the Dept. of Computer Science and Engineering at POSTECH (Summa Cum Laude) and in the Division of Information and Computer Engineering at Ajou University (with honor) in 2006 and 2004, respectively. He is a recipient of various awards including NSF Career Award (2021), IU Trustees Teaching Award (2021), IEEE SPS Best Paper Award (2020), and Google and Starkey’s grants for outstanding student papers in ICASSP 2013 and 2014, respectively. He is an IEEE Senior Member and also a member of the IEEE Audio and Acoustic Signal Processing Technical Committee (2018-2023). He is serving as an Associate Editor for EURASIP Journal of Audio, Speech, and Music Processing, and as a Consulting Associate Editor for IEEE Open Journal of Signal Processing. He is also a reviewer, program committee member, or area chair for the major machine learning and signal processing. He filed more than 50 patent applications as an inventor.

Dec
9
Fri
Mark Hasegawa-Johnson (University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign) “Zipf’s Law Suggests a Three-Pronged Approach to Inclusive Speech Recognition” @ Hackerman Hall B17
Dec 9 @ 12:00 pm – 1:15 pm

Abstract

Zipf’s law is commonly glossed by the aphorism “infrequent words are frequent,” but in practice, it has often meant that there are three types of words: frequent, infrequent, and out-of-vocabulary (OOV). Speech recognition solved the problem of frequent words in 1970 (with dynamic time warping).  Hidden Markov models worked well for moderately infrequent words, but the problem of OOV words was not solved until sequence-to-sequence neural nets de-reified the concept of a word.  Many other social phenomena follow power-law distributions.  The number of native speakers of the N’th most spoken language, for example, is 1.44 billion over N to the 1.09.  In languages with sufficient data, we have shown that monolingual pre-training outperforms multilingual pre-training.  In less-frequent languages, multilingual knowledge transfer can significantly reduce phone error rates.  In languages with no training data, unsupervised ASR methods can be proven to converge, as long as the eigenvalues of the language model are sufficiently well separated to be measurable. Other systems of social categorization may follow similar power-law distributions.  Disability, for example, can cause speech patterns that were never seen in the training database, but not all disabilities need do so.  The inability of speech technology to work for people with even common disabilities is probably caused by a lack of data, and can probably be solved by finding better modes of interaction between technology researchers and the communities served by technology.

Biography

Mark Hasegawa-Johnson is a William L. Everitt Faculty Fellow of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the University of Illinois in Urbana-Champaign.  He has published research in speech production and perception, source separation, voice conversion, and low-resource automatic speech recognition.

Center for Language and Speech Processing